Americans are wasteful even at the Farmers Market

Today was another eye-opening experience at the farmers market. I am lucky to live in a community where we have at least 4 farmers markets within about a 12 mile area. I live in a small town of a zip code population of about 4,000 people and the neighboring town may have a zip code population that is double that. So together we may have about 12,000 with 4 farmers markets. We live in an agriculturally diverse area and many families also grow large gardens to can or freeze their own healthy foods. So farm fresh food is not hard to find here but today I learned that we as Americans are still looking at food in a non-realistic, non-healthy way.

Cody, Christopher and Paige Powers picking tomatoes and peppers in the garden

Cody, Christopher and Paige Powers picking tomatoes and peppers in the garden

I am getting ready to put up about 7 quarts of home-made spaghetti sauce and spent the morning talking to an older woman who worked the farm market stand. We of course talked about what I was making and what was real fresh and what they were short on. So after several minutes she headed out to the cooler to box up my order, as I bagged up the rest of my items. When she returned and I payed for 23 pounds of tomatoes and 5 pounds of peppers. She asked me if I might be  interested in the of tomatoes sitting on the counter. The box was about 5 pounds of over ripe, soft or damaged tomatoes. She said “no one wants these, they are not perfect. If you take them they are free.” Well of course I wanted them, why wouldn’t I, an over ripe tomato is the best tomato of all. I went on to explain that they looked pretty good to me and that I would just juice them when I got home. She felt better and I was over joyed to have another 5 pounds of tomatoes to take home.

Harvest Basket in the garden 2014

Harvest Basket in the garden 2014

Then on my way home it hit me. Why in the world would she say that unless she had thrown out many items from their stand. Tossed away food that was totally edible but not PERFECT. Why in this day and age would some one throw away food that could feed a needy family or a homeless person? Why are Americans so trained to think that a blemish is not normal or common? I felt offended at the thought that we are so wasteful. That we are not able to think about real food in an honest way. Fresh from the garden food is not perfect if you are realistic. It is only a farmer who sprays his crops with pesticides that never gets bug damage. It is only the tomato that is half-ripe and processed with chlorine that looks red but is hard and perfect looking at the Big  Box Store. It is only on a store shelf where food color is added  to tomato juice to make it red. Why are we eating like this?

As I drove, I got madder and madder. I thought about the millions of children who only see their food on the shelf at Fred Myers, King Supers or the Piggly Wiggly.  They will never see  green beans and peas growing on a vine or carrots are dug up from underground. Some will never know that their french fries are under that bushy plant and are dug up before being fried to a crispy treat. We are raising food ignorant children. We are raising people who have no real idea what fresh from the garden food looks like or tastes like. What a shame that our country has the most money and is the most disconnected from our food.

So when I got home I washed the box full of  blemished tomatoes. I cut away a few spots and pulled out a stem or two and did this.

free tomatoes ready to be made into juice

free tomatoes ready for juicing

I juiced the tomatoes and made about 1 gallon of fresh juice that my family can make into chili, a soup stock, a V-8 drink  or a marinade for a tough deer stake. I am sure I will freeze some as soon as I get a couple of freezer containers. I will use most of it fresh with in a couple of days. I am thinking that a deer roast with peppers, onions, tomatoes in the slow cooker sounds good. I am proud that I have used what others would have thrown out. I have saved my family money with free food and I have saved my child from eating processed food once again.

1 gallon fresh tomato juice  for free.

1 gallon fresh tomato juice for free.

When will American’s learn to look at food and its usefulness in less wasteful way? Was my grandmother crazy when she said,” Waste Not, Want Not.” I hope that slowly I am teaching my children that food does not need to look perfect to taste wonderful. That we can still use a deformed carrot in stew and make jam out of over ripe fruit. That we are able to live closer to the land because we understand that nothing in this life is perfect, but what God provides for us is perfectly made for our use. Amen!

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Categories: Chili, cooking, country cooking, family health, gardening, health, Homestead, organic foods, regional food, soup, steak with peppers, Tomatoes, Uncategorized, venison | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

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12 thoughts on “Americans are wasteful even at the Farmers Market

  1. The amount of food that is wasted in this country is a very sad statistic. One of our local farm markets closed because people were too hard to deal with. They wanted perfect looking food and dicng even understand the fact that they were getting fresh food.

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  2. Great point! We need to do as you do more often. Thanks for reminding me.

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  3. I love this post, Jolynn! I couldn’t agree with you more — there is something very wrong with how most Americans look at food. I am very much the “odd duck” in my family by having a passion for gardening, farming, foraging, etc. Just this past weekend, I caught my mother going to throw out almost 3 lbs. of food that she purchased from a local market. When I asked her why, she said “Oh, there’s some soft spots. They’re getting yucky.” In about an hour’s time, I had everything prepped, preserved, or frozen + put the food into my freezer for the year. I don’t understand why so many people want to live in excess, accept only perfection, and not give a minute to think about all the people in the world who are starving or go without.

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    • Caitlin it is nice to hear from you again… thanks for the comment. I am a little bit of an Odd Duck too…. to bad you are not closer we could go foraging together.

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  4. Jolynn, you are SO right! I shop my local farmer’s market and have occasionally been the happy recipient of less-than-perfect castoffs. My pleasure. And at the grocery store I always check out the produce that’s been marked down drastically because it wasn’t pretty. As a gardener I quickly learned that those picture-perfect specimens don’t often happen in real life. Thanks for a great post! 🙂 ~Terri

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  5. Maggid

    Wonderful; post – thank you . . (as in “Amen to That!”)

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  6. Thanks Dan for introducing me to this site. Thanks Jolynn, great read!

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  7. I enjoyed your post and it too made me angry, but so many folks are so far away from understanding how things are grown/agriculture it is quite sad. I have acquaintances who think my small flock of eggs are more dirty and dangerous to eat than grocer store eggs. I am like you I grew up canning what we could not eat that day. We threw nothing away as a kid and the same is true as and adult.

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  8. You go, girl!!! I used to grind all my food for my babies, too…never used Gerber stuff…(a few decades ago, sigh)
    My mouth was watering just looking at your fresh tomato juice.
    🙂

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  9. Not just Americans who are wasteful! 🙂 Saw this in many parts of the world and have sadly seen many go hungry. And I totally agree with you on processed food not being healthy, especially for children! 🙂

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