Carpal Tunnel and Cubital Tunnel Surgery Success

4 weeks into my husband’s Carpal Tunnel and Cubital Tunnel recovery we still have 4 more weeks to go. I feel a little overwhelmed these days. I am working away from home for the first time in a couple of years and this is the same few weeks that my husband was able to have surgery on his right hand and elbow. So between the new job, Christopher’s school work and having a husband who has no use of his right hand, I have been working over time.

It seems as if everything always happens at once in my life. There’s never a middle ground. Last fall I found I had hours with nothing to do and no motivation to do anything after the death of the mother in law that I helped to take care of. I felt empty and lost without her, even though I had my own sons and husband to care for. In December I vowed to myself that I would continue to serve others in some way. I applied to serve with AmeriCorps so that I could do community service in a larger way and found The Elkins Main Street program a great place to work. But little did I know, that my husband’s surgery we planned for May or June would be jumped forward to the middle of Feb. It was a good surprise,having the surgery so early in the year, but put my planning and organisation skills to the test. Finding babysitters and arranging my schedule to attend meetings and still finding time to cook a few family meals was always on my mind, while he was in and out of the hospital.

So in less than 10 days I went from having a hardworking husband to having a new patient to look after. I can tell you that losing the use of your primary hand is inconvenient and limiting in so many ways…. Just think, you can not button your clothes, open a jar, or eating normally. It slows eating times to a crawl(unless your wife loves you enough to cut up your meat). There is pain and discomfort after surgery too. It makes the first few days even more challenging, I finally got to sleep in my bed a couple of nights ago. The arm that has the surgery gets wrapped from fingertip to upper arm in a wad of cotton and ace bandages and needs elevated at night.In the end it is just easier for the “Arm” to have my side of the bed. So sleeping was not something I was doing regularly, as I moved from bed to couch and back again trying to find a good spot to rest where I could still hear the alarm clock.

Tom Powers after one week check up and removal of half the bandages and packing Feb 2016

Tom Powers after one week check up and removal of half the bandages and packing Feb 2016

This is the second time my husband has had these surgeries. It has been 3 years since Tom had the same procedures done to his left arm and hand. We both agree with his Dr,these procedures are necessary because of my husband’s recurring work with things that cause hard concussions. In his case, years of working construction and hammering horse hooves and anvils has taken its toll. The surgeries will make it possible for him to go back to work and continue to do what he loves with a little more care and management to keep these injuries from happening again.

Tom is healing and he will be able to return to work in the middle of April. This time he is not allowed to run a Jackhammer … EVER! I am sure he will be more protective of his hands and arms in the future because no one enjoys having an injury that never heals. Funny, how everything has worked out for the best so far, I have been able to support Tom when he needed it, work has been more than understanding about the time I have had to miss and Christopher has enjoyed having the extra time with his dad. We are all also looking forward to getting our routines back to normal soon. We all are looking forward to  spring turkey hunting and trout fishing with a father/husband who is feeling well again. We all are ready for the longer sunny days outside and I am ready to have a normal routine again.

 

 

 

 

 

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Categories: blacksmith work, Elkins Main Street, Family, Healing, health, trout, Turkey season | Tags: , , , , , | 11 Comments

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11 thoughts on “Carpal Tunnel and Cubital Tunnel Surgery Success

  1. I can sympathize because I’ve had this carpal tunnel surgery. It’s a huge nuisance until everything heals, but it’s better than not getting it done. Things will get better!

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  2. Hopping for a speedy recovery, large trout, fat turkeys and a Happy Gardening season.

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  3. We’re wishing Tom a speedy recovery. I can’t wait to read that he’s back to work and pain free.

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  4. Sandra Sweeney

    Jolynn, I need HELP! This has nothing to do with your post but you are the one person I am aware of who might be able to offer some advice. Our two donkeys are being exceptionally stubborn about getting into our livestock truck so we can take them up on Spruce Knob with the cattle. They have been in the chute at the base of the inclined ramp since last night. I have bribed them with apple chunks drizzled with molasses, sweet feed drizzled with molasses, and water. The only positive thing to come of our efforts thus far is that the donkeys have let me get up close and personal and have not even tried to bite or kick. I’ve been able to remove the halter from one (we only had one halter) and that girl has enjoyed having her fur rubbed and scratched where the halter was. I’ve removed some of those really stubborn burrs that we have here – like pointy-ended miniature pine cones that stick like nothing I’ve ever seen! Both donkeys seem to greatly appreciate having me remove those little nasties. I’ve managed to slip a web strap behind their behinds, around their necks, and around their middles, and then attached the strap to a winch, but they just do not budge. I’ve offered more bribes and water but nothing! HELP! What else can we try!

    Thanks – someday, I’ll meet you in Elkins and we’ll have coffee.

    Sandra Sweeney

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Sandra Sweeney

    We managed to get the donkeys in – and out! More later!

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    • Sandra I glad to hear that you were able to get them moved… donkeys are just a little different… they need to think it was their idea before they will do anything….and I mean anything… you will likely have this same problem again when you move them back. You may need to just park the trailer at the shoot sooner so they can investigate it and maybe feed them in it for a couple of days before trying to load them… best of luck!

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  6. Oh my that’s a big change. I wish him a speedy recovery and wish you the strength to manage with ‘one hand’ less. It will come to pass.

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  7. Sounds like it will be a hard adjustment for a while. He will probably appreciate you even more and you will be glad to have “normal” back again when it comes!

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